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This is exactly what happens when government programs are instituted. These things CANNOT stand on their own, hence expansion is always needed to support the parasite. This is why we have city, county and state government. The MetCouncil, like all gvmt programs, starts out with a noble goal, uniting infrastructure needs between Mpls and St. Paul. And now look. a 2040 vision to essentially take control of all inner AND outer ring suburbs. Then what? a 2060 vision to control all transportation needs for the state? This is garbage. The MetCouncil needs to be abolished. They've done their job, now go away.

0 Comments 1 Vote Created

This is exactly what happens when government programs are instituted. These things CANNOT stand on their own, hence expansion is always needed to support the parasite. This is why we have city, county and state government. The MetCouncil, like all gvmt programs, starts out with a noble goal, uniting infrastructure needs between Mpls and St. Paul. And now look. a 2040 vision to essentially take control of all inner AND outer ring suburbs. Then what? a 2060 vision to control all transportation needs for the state? This is garbage. The MetCouncil needs to be abolished. They've done their job, now go away.

5 Votes Acknowledged

This is exactly what happens when government programs are instituted. These things CANNOT stand on their own, hence expansion is always needed to support the parasite. This is why we have city, county and state government. The MetCouncil, like all gvmt programs, starts out with a noble goal, uniting infrastructure needs between Mpls and St. Paul. And now look. a 2040 vision to essentially take control of all inner AND outer ring suburbs. Then what? a 2060 vision to control all transportation needs for the state? This is garbage. The MetCouncil needs to be abolished. They've done their job, now go away.

0 Comments 1 Vote Created

Katie x over 4 years ago

Surface parking lots are not only an eye sore but terribly utilized space. Especially around malls and shopping centers, the majority of spaces remain unused until perhaps Christmas time. Surface parking lots are simply bad urban planning. Firstly, they create more distance between destinations, which reduces a person's ability and desire to walk, bike, or take public transit. Secondly, they increase a city's 'island heat effect' - making summer heat spells worse. And thirdly, surface parking lots increase surface water run-off, which either is treated at wastewater treatment plant (adding to taxpayer expenses) or is dumped directly into waterways, thereby hurting our regional water quality. It is time to move past 1960's urban planning ideas that require x number of parking spaces for y ft^2 of building. I'm a realist though and understand that cars need places to be parked. If parking is to be built, it needs to be vertical, not spread out. Lots, especially in downtown should be developed into housing, retail space, parks, and offices. Let's improve the Walkscore of the Twin Cities by filling in surface parking lots with things people need on a weekly basis like grocery stores, retail shops, and work places. New York City, Chicago, and San Fransisco aren't cool cities, because they're a parker's paradise; they are filled with life and people who are able to conveniently walk to their destinations. Let's do the same in the Twin Cities. Let's make it so we use our space for living and less for parking cars.

9 Votes Acknowledged

Idea: More cars

Matt Saint Germain over 4 years ago

Break away from the collective mindset and secure independence. Promote vehicle ownership and travel to destinations where public transit can't take you.

3 Votes Acknowledged

Congestion during the morning and afternoon rush hours could be greatly alleviated by more teleworking.  There are many types of jobs (particularly office jobs) where people could work from home one or more days/week.  The effect of more teleworking is less peak hour demand on our roadways, less need for future road and bridge expansion (saves money), greater employer satisfaction/retention, improved profitibility for businesses since they need less office space, etc.  Teleworking is being done in metro areas all over the United States including right here in the Twin Cities.  Let's be a national leader in teleworking!

15 Votes Acknowledged

James x almost 5 years ago

There are a couple of reasons why MnPASS lanes are a solution to some of the region's transportation issues:

1. Motorists have a choice of the free general purpose lanes or the MnPASS lane.

2. MnPASS lanes preserve the travel advantage for transit and carpools, which encourages these forms of transport.  Transit and carpools use the MnPASS lanes for free, skip the congestion, and riders can enjoy a reliable trip time.  Also, encouraging transit takes extra vehicles off the roads for everyone else who is driving.

3. No matter what the congestion, motorists can get to a work meeting, pick up their kids from daycare, get to child’s sporting event, get to shift job on time (without the I-394 MnPASS lanes, I would have been late to countless business meetings-they are good for business).

4. By just adding another free general purpose lane, after a few years, the congestion will fill up this new lanes, leaving people frustrated again.  MnPASS will help preserve the road investment because as more people want to use the lane, the price rises to keep the lane moving at highway speeds.

3 Votes Acknowledged

Idea: More HOURCAR

Mary Morse almost 5 years ago

HOURCAR car sharing serves nearly 1,800 Twin Cities drivers. HOURCAR is a locally-managed nonprofit service that receives raves from its members. Car sharing saves users thousands of dollars each year over car ownership. HOURCAR allows people to expand their transportation palette to include transit, biking, walking, and carpooling, and gives them the freedom to use a private car when they need it. There should be an HOURCAR hub within a 5-block walk of every transit stop in the Twin Cities.

14 Votes Acknowledged
Small2_met-taxi-logo_1

One taxi licensing system metro-wide, one number for dispatching, one fare system.

It is nearly impossible for a taxi driver or company to work in the entire region. Each city requires a license, which, because they are restricted become incredibly expensive. Drivers are reluctant to take passengers to another city because they do not have a license to pick up a passenger in the other city once they are dropped off. Pricing in each city is slightly different. Pricing in general is too complicated to figure out for passengers.

A Met Council administered taxi system, whether with private companies or as the sole taxi service owned by the Met Council, would simplify things immensely for both the passengers and the operators. Such a system could guanantee a certain base salary for on-call drivers and elliminate the further complication and embarrasment of tipping. Taking a taxi should be as easy as using a bus or buying a soda.

A single dispatching system would only require one phone number for passengers to know, and would insure that the closest taxi was called, not just the closest one from the taxi company whose phone number is known.

I propose this taxi service be refered to as MetTaxi. The number to call for dispatching would be:

638-8294 (met-taxi)

no matter what area code you are in (unless you are using a phone from out of town, then I guess it would be 612). Yes, the number is available.

As for pricing I am thinking (and still working out) a system based on radius rather than distance. Using GIS info, a driver could enter an address or the name of the drop off, the computer would mark it on the map and the fare would be calculated. Within a 2 mile radius the fare would be $5, the minimum fare. (Most people live within a 3 mile radius of Target.) Fares could be paid by cash, credit card, or GoTo card, just like on a bus, with the driver handling no cash. Other fares would be predetermind to and from major landmarks (the airport, MoA, the downtowns, the U, etc.) Passengers should not be punished for traffic and drivers should feel free to use different routes based on experience without the passenger being made to feel like they are being taken advantage of. The idea is that taxi rides should be for shorter distances, too far to walk and when a bus or train is not available. Also, the fare is per ride, not per person, so bring your friends.

It would be nice to have a uniform set of vehicles, too. Perhaps a small hybrid minivan.

Taxis are a very practical transportation alternative. They have the flexibility of driving but do not require parking. That practicality should be as easy to access as possible. At the very least licensing, dispatching, and fares need to be consolidated metro-wide, for the sake of the drivers and the passengers.

23 Votes Acknowledged

If buses ran when people used them, then people would use buses more. When you cut a route down to every 1/2 hour, then people's logic is: oh well, it would take longer than driving; or, I'll go to the stop and have to wait there in the dark for 20 min (or 40) so it's too dangerous. Personally, I used to get to downtown Mpls, Rosedale, or the airport in about 12 min by bus. Once they put the train in, they fed  those routes (with the exception of Rosedale of course) to the train, so I have to take the bus to the train, wait in a terrible neighborhood for 20 min or so, and then get on the train. The train is beautiful, but the implementation means that a trip to the airport takes 45 min and downtown takes 1.5 HOURS! Rest assured, I drive, hire a taxi, or get a friend to pick me up. Not exactly what you (Met Council) had in mind! I hope your implementation of the University line will fix some of these problems.

16 Votes Acknowledged