Brendon x over 2 years ago

The Upper Midwest has already seen a 31 percent increase in heavy precipitation events since 1958.  The Twin Cities needs to prepare for increasing flooding, more heatwaves and more severe weather.  We should also preparing for the potential immigration of people from areas that will be impacted to an even greater extent.  We need to plan our buildings, transportation and social infrastructure systems not only to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but to be more resilient in the face of rapid changes.

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Brian Ross about 2 years ago

The historic and future changes in extreme storm events should be explicitly incorporated into the system statements that guide individual cities' comp plans.  Increasing capacity of stormwater infastructure will likely increase costs for new development.  Additional capacity for managing stormwater will be needed for road systems as well, again likely increasing costs as roads are rebuilt. 

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Breanne x about 2 years ago

Think carefully about requiring millions of dollars to be spent on I/I, then increasing requirements for the pre-treatment of stormwater to increase surface water quality. While I understand that the cost of treating stormwater is not as expensive as wastewater, it also does not make sense to require local governments to spend millions separating the systems only to have to pay the cost to treat stormwater as well.

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