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Leaders suggest that water resources will be important to the region’s success and competitiveness over the next 30 years. How should the Thrive MSP 2040 policies guide these considerations? 

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The 7-county Twin Cities metropolitan area contains three majestic rivers, 950 lakes, extensive wetlands and a 1,000-foot deep aquifer system. These abundant resources provide the region with a reliable source of high-quality water. But as demand for water grows, it will be evermore important to assure stewardship of this important natural resource and work with interested partners to address potential issues and concerns.  Greater MSP lists our region's coordinated wastewater treatment and plentiful water resources among the key pieces of information for consultants to weigh in choosing the region to locate a business. What do you think? Are water resources important for our region's competitiveness? Read more about Greater MSP's work. 

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The 2030 Water Resources Management Policy Plan (a key element of the 2030 Regional Development Framework) includes three primary goals: • Ensuring a plentiful water supply: develop a comprehensive water supply planning framework to evaluate water resources and plan for efficient use, particularly as demand for regional water grows; assure capital investments are balanced between regional and local interests; review local plans and convene inter-community task forces as necessary to address issues.  • Preserving wastewater capacity for regional growth: address inflow and infiltration to preserve long-term system capacity; focus expansion on the urbanized portions of the region; evaluate circumstances for the Council to share costs of system improvements with local communities. • Protecting the quality of water: control non-point source pollution, including agricultural and urban runoff; evaluate local comprehensive plans to better address surface water management; partner with local governments and water organizations to monitor water quality in the region's lakes, rivers, and streams, provide technical assistance to institute best practices to reduce runoff and prevent erosion and flooding; and revew comprehensive plans to assure communiities are reducing impacts on the wastewater system.  Read the full plan.  What do you think? Do these policies work? Any changes/adjustments you'd recommend? Other advice? 

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The Twin Cities metropolitan area is responsible for over half of Minnesota’s drinking water.. There are over 60,000 wells in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. The cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul get water from the Mississippi River. Together, they use less than 2% of the average annual river flow. Approximately two thirds of the drinking water used in the Twin Cities metropolitan area comes from groundwater; one third is supplied by the Mississippi River. The deepest well ever drilled in the Twin Cities metropolitan area was a test well 4,000 feet deep. The deepest public water supply well in the Twin Cities metropolitan area is in Edina; that well is over 1,100 feet deep and draws water from the Mt. Simon-Hinckley aquifer. The shallowest drinking water well in the Twin Cities metropolitan area is a private well only 10 feet deep. The average depth for wells in the Twin Cities metropolitan area is 185 feet deep. Most wells pump water out of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer. About half of all the lakes, streams, and wetlands in the Twin Cities metropolitan area are directly connected to groundwater. A calcareous fen is one of the rarest types of wetlands in the world. They are directly connected to groundwater, and there are 11 in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. Two well known examples are Savage Fen and Seminary Fen. There are over 100 public water suppliers in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. Most rely on groundwater, but some get water from the Mississippi River. 

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Water early in the morning to minimize evaporation. Never water faster than the ground can absorb the water. Next time you water, place 3 to 5 empty tuna or cat food cans at varied distances from the sprinkler. The time it takes to fill the cans is about how long you should water your lawn (This should take only 15 to 30 minutes). Step on the grass; if it springs back up when you move your foot, it does not need water. Arrange plants in your garden by light and watering needs. Adjust sprinklers to avoid watering sidewalks and driveways. Collect rain water in a rain barrel for watering your lawn and plants. Cut grass no shorter than 2 inches to reduce evaporation and promote deep root growth. When hiring an irrigator, look for a certified landscape irrigation professional. 

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Live Tweets – 10/19/12

Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews We're getting ready to kick off the water resources discussion. If you're joining us, use the #waterMSP and #thriveMSP hashtags. Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews Welcome to the #thriveMSP #waterMSP discussion! First a little information about who's here on the @metcouncilnews handle (1 of 2) Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews Michelle Fure @metcouncilnews communications and Lanya Ross@metcouncilnews environmental scientist - water specialist (2 of 2) Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews We’ll start our discussion today with some basic information about water in the Twin Cities region. Tweet questions #thriveMSP#waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews The Twin Cities metropolitan area is responsible for over half of Minnesota’s drinking water. #thriveMSP #waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews There are over 60,000 wells in the Twin Cities metropolitan area.#thriveMSP #waterMSP      Neil Cunningham ‏@greennoises      @MetCouncilNews #thriveMSP #waterMSP Some r used to monitor GW levels - surprise! - @ DNR     they're calld groundwater-level monitoring wells      Neil Cunningham ‏@greennoises      @greennoises #waterMSP And gw level monitoring wells provide valuable data! data increases in value the longer the well has been monitored     Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews     @greennoises True! And that can be valuable to communities to anticipate potential water supply problems eg dry wells. #waterMSP#thriveMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews Together, @cityminneapolis and @cityofsaintpaul use less than 2% of the average annual Mississippi River flow. #thriveMSP #waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews Approximately 2/3 of the drinking water used in the metro area comes from groundwater; 1/3 from the Mississippi. #thriveMSP #waterMSP      Neil Cunningham ‏@greennoises      @MetCouncilNews @greennoises It suggests everyone, not just large use permit holders, but individuals 2 need 2 join the conservation effort      Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews      @greennoises Tell us more - what about that interest you?      Neil Cunningham ‏@greennoises      @MetCouncilNews @mndnr #waterMSP Interesting to note in the news release DNR Commish. Landwehr calling 4 a "collaborative response" Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews The deepest well ever drilled in the Twin Cities metropolitan area was a test well 4,000 feet deep. #thriveMSP #waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews Approximately 2/3 of the drinking water used in the metro area comes from groundwater; 1/3 from the Mississippi. #thriveMSP #waterMSP      Lanya Ross ‏@lanyaross      @MetCouncilNews Where is the best tasting water? I think it's from the well where I grew up! #waterMSP #thrive MSP      Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews      @lanyaross Where do you grow up? #waterMSP #thriveMSP      Lanya Ross ‏@lanyaross      @MetCouncilNews Southwestern Minnesota. Maybe not technically the best water, but it tastes like home.      Neil Cunningham ‏@greennoises      @lanyaross @MetCouncilNews #waterMSP The cold iron-y tasting water from a hand-pumped well on Crane Island in Lake Minnetonka...       Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews      @greennoises Reminds me of the well my childhood home in the west metro. Didn't taste the same when we hooked up to city water.#waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews What we do with our water here in the metro has a big impact elsewhere. See how 4th graders are learning that. http://bit.ly/OAZINH  Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews In @EdinaMN, the deepest public well (1,100 ft) in the metro area draws water from the Mt. Simon-Hinckley aquifer. #thriveMSP#waterMSP Jenna Covey ‏@jennacovey @MetCouncilNews How will drought in MN affect our H20 usage in the TCs? What can we do to conserve? #ThriveMSP #waterMSP      Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews      @jennacovey Great question. Because the growing season has wrapped up, hopefully drought won't increase our water use this year.#waterMSP      Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews      @jennacovey If dry conditions continue (and even if they don't) we have a conservation toolbox with tips. #waterMSP http://bit.ly/RGLA4Y       Neil Cunningham ‏@greennoises      @MetCouncilNews @jennacovey #waterMSP Thanks! I like the water footprint calculator tool - nice 2 have in yr toolbox.http://www.waterfootprint.org/?page=cal/WaterFootprintCalculator …      Jenna Covey ‏@jennacovey      @MetCouncilNews Thanks for the tips! #waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews The shallowest drinking water well in the Twin Cities metro area is a private well only 10 ft deep. #thriveMSP #waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews The average well depth in the metro area is 185 ft deep. Most wells pump out of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer. #thriveMSP#waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews The deepest well ever drilled in the Twin Cities metropolitan area was a test well 4,000 feet deep. #thriveMSP #waterMSP      Thatcher Imboden ‏@ouruptown      @MetCouncilNews where was 4000 ft well located?      Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews       @ouruptown good question - we'll have to post a little later. We don't have the specific database here right now. But stay tuned.#waterMSP      Neil Cunningham ‏@greennoises      @MetCouncilNews @ouruptown #waterMSP Wells r numbered & the number can b used 2 lookup well info on County Well Index http://mdh-agua.health.state.mn.us/cwi/cwiViewer.htm …       Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews      @greennoises Thanks! we were looking there, but didn't have the number! #waterMSP @thriveMSP       MetCouncilNews12:38pm via HootSuite     @ouruptown All - here's the answer: the 4,000 ft well was drilled by Northern Natural Gas in Maple Grove in 1975. #thriveMSP #waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews About 1/2 of all the lakes, streams, and wetlands in the metro area are directly connected to groundwater. #thriveMSP #waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews Among the more than 100 public water suppliers in the metro area, most rely on groundwater, but some the Mississippi. #thriveMSP#waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews A calcareous fen one of the rarest wetland types is directly connected to groundwater. There are 11 in the metro area. #thriveMSP#waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews Drink water from private well? Test the water for arsenic and nitrate. Detail from @mnhealth. #thriveMSP #waterMSP http://bit.ly/PaHItP  Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews You likely use more water than you drink or shower with each day. Calculate your water footprint: http://bit.ly/RabQ5z  #thriveMSP #waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews ICYMI: This video shows how the Council keeps the region’s water safe and clean. http://bit.ly/T0GBfj  #thriveMSP #watermsp Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews Learn more about pollution prevention funded through MN’s Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment. http://bit.ly/Tv32WJ  #thriveMSP#waterMSP Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews We’re wrapping up. We encourage you to discuss on the Council’s Your Ideas site for the #thriveMSP effort. #waterMSP http://bit.ly/RUnvEZ  Metropolitan Council ‏@MetCouncilNews @green_noises Thanks everyone for participating! #thriveMSP#waterMSP

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